Portrait of Dr Steven Taylor Dr Steven Taylor

s.taylor@hud.ac.uk | 01484 47


  @steve_j_taylor  


Biography

Steven J. Taylor joined the University of Huddersfield in 2016 as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Health Histories.  He completed his PhD in 2015 at the Centre for Medical Humanities, University of Leicester, and subsequently held a six-month Research Resources Bursary at the same institution. He has a wide and varied range of research interests covering the administration, management, and experience of child insanity in England to the emigration pathways of pauper children to Canada during the late-nineteenth century.  To date he has published articles in Family and Community History, History of Psychiatry, and History (forthcoming) and his first monograph Beyond the Asylum: Child Insanity in Nineteenth-Century England is due for publication in 2016 with Palgrave Macmillan.

Research and Scholarship

Research interests span the period from the eighteenth to twentieth century and cover topics as varied as mental illness and childhood through to regional development and conceptual notions of perfection/imperfection.  In particular my work has focused on reactions to childhood poverty and sickness.  I am currently working on two projects that are at differing stages of development.  These are:

(i) ‘“Perfect” and “Imperfect” Bodies: a History of Childhood Health and Improvement’.  This research explores the changing perception of children in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries and how parents, philanthropists, teachers, and doctors sought to improve children deemed to be physically or mentally ‘imperfect’. 

(ii) A reconstruction of the lives of children sent as migrants to Canada in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries tentatively entitled ‘Fractured Childhoods’.  The project has received a Scouloudi Historical Award and a small grant from the Foundation for Canadian Studies in the UK that have funded archival research at various British archives, the Archives of Ontario, and the University of Toronto.

Esteem

2015-2017: H-Childhood, Editor