Portrait of Dr Daniel Belton Dr Daniel Belton

View research degree topics that Dr Daniel Belton might supervise

d.j.belton@hud.ac.uk | 01484 471213



Biography

Dr Daniel Belton MEng PhD AMIChemE MRSC was appointed as a Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry at Huddersfield in 2008. He was awarded his MEng (hons) in Chemical Engineering from UMIST, which included industrial placements at Jacobs Engineering and BNFL. He then studied for a PhD in Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science with Dr Aline Miller at the University of Manchester. The PhD was sponsored by industry (Avecia and Intertek) and focused on the stability of Protective Antigen, the active ingredient in a new anthrax vaccine.

Principal research interests are in biopharmaceutical stability, protein behaviour, smart particles for drug delivery and 2nd generation biofuels. The work encompasses various areas of analytical chemistry including spectroscopy, analytical bioscience and particle characterisation.

Research and Scholarship

Protein Behaviour and Biopharmaceutical Stability

Aggregation is a major issue with many biopharmaceutical proteins. There is a need to characterise the effect of environmental conditions (temp, pH, ionic strength etc), processing conditions and formulation on stability in order to improve the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. Key areas of work include:

  • Aggregation: growth rate, kinetics and thermodynamics using light scattering
  • Formulation: testing effect of additives on stability and aggregation
  • Processing: effect of different processing conditions on stability and aggregation
  • Properties: modelling UV absorption coefficient and refractive index from structure
  • Folding: analysis of protein unfolding and refolding using spectroscopic methods

Smart Particles for Drug Delivery

Effective delivery of therapeutic macromolecules (proteins, DNA etc) is a major challenge. The use of smart particles could greatly enhance the pharmacokinetics of such agents if the particles are able to overcome a number of challenges, such as extended residence time within the body, targeting of cells or tissue and trafficking across cell membranes (i.e. to cross blood-brain barrier or to target DNA to cell nucleus etc).There is a need to optimise properties for both physical stability and biological interaction. Key areas of work include:

  • Synthesis: model systems which combine biological functionality with physical stability
  • Characterisation: physical stability (using analytical techniques) and biological interaction (using biological assays)

2nd Generation Biofuels

Climate change and over dependency on oil and gas has led to increased interest in biofuels. The first generation of biofuels have been criticised for competing with food production, high energy demand and use of fertilisers. Second generation biofuels seek to address these issues by utilising waste cellulosic by-products from forestry and agriculture. There are many challenges in converting such materials into useful liquid fuels. One possible route is gasification and catalysis. However, the extreme processing conditions required gives rise to major challenges for catalyst stability and life-time. There is a need to characterise catalyst performance under these conditions and ultimately develop a new generation of more robust catalysts. Key areas of work include:

  • Characterisation: catalyst performance and degradation under normal operating conditions
  • Development: theory guided development using various approaches to improve stability

Publications and Other Research Outputs

2017

Daniel, B. and Kevin, P. (2017) ‘Sterling Metal Enhancement Ltd: Context and Problem­based Learning in Analytical Chemistry’. In: Variety in Chemistry Education and Physics Higher Education Conference 2017, 24th-25th August 2017, York, UK

Daniel, B (2017) ‘Creating a rich and immersive learning journey using differentiated resources and active learning environments’. In: Variety in Chemistry Education and Physics Higher Education Conference 2017, 24th-25th August 2017, York, UK

Daniel, B (2017) ‘Developing competence with process simulation tools in undergraduate chemical engineering and chemistry programmes’. In: Variety in Chemistry Education and Physics Higher Education Conference 2017, 24th-25th August 2017, York, UK

2016

Belton, D (2016) ‘Teaching process simulation using video-enhanced and discovery/inquiry-based learning: methodology and analysis within a theoretical framework for skill acquisitionEducation for Chemical Engineers , 17, pp. 54-64. ISSN 1749-7728

Belton, D (2016) ‘Stages of Skill AcquisitionEducation for Chemical Engineers , 17. ISSN 1749-7728

Almond, M., Belton, D., Humphreys, P. and Laws, A. (2016) ‘A study of the metal binding capacity of saccharinic acids formed during the alkali catalysed decomposition of cellulosic materials: nickel complexation by glucoisosaccharinic acids and xyloisosaccharinic acidsCarbohydrate Research , 427, pp. 48-54. ISSN 0008-6215

Campbell, G. and Belton, D. (2016) ‘Setting up new chemical engineering degree programmes: Exercises in design and retrofit within constraintsEducation for Chemical Engineers , 17, pp. 1-13. ISSN 1749-7728

Belton, D (2016) ‘Teaching process simulation using video-enhanced and discovery/inquiry-based learning’. In: ChemEngDayUK 2016, 31st March to 1st April 2016, Bath, UK

Austerberry, J. and Belton, D. (2016) ‘The aggregation of cytochrome C may be linked to its flexibility during refolding3 Biotech , 6 (1). ISSN 2190-572X

2015

Knapton, S. and Belton, D. (2015) ‘Active Learning Resources for 'Students as Researchers'’. In: RSC Chemistry Teaching Symposium: Showcase for Student Projects on Chemical Education, 2nd June 2015, York, UK

Harling, G. and Belton, D. (2015) ‘Creating an Immersive Learning Experience for Teaching ICP-MS’. In: RSC Chemistry Teaching Symposium: Showcase for Student Projects on Chemical Education, 2nd June 2015, York, UK

Torpe, A. and Belton, D. (2015) ‘Improved Spectrophotometric Analysis of Fullerenes C60 and C70 in High-solubility Organic SolventsAnalytical Sciences , 31 (2), pp. 125-130. ISSN 1348-2246

2014

Bentley, S., Allan, R. and Belton, D. (2014) ‘Flipping the Classroom with Peer Instruction - How Effective Is It?’. In: eLearning 2.0, 23 July 2014, Brunel Business School

Belton, D (2014) ‘Experience of Trying Out the Inverted Classroom Approach’. In: ChemEngDayUK 2014, 7th to 8th April 2014, Manchester, UK

2013

Bentley, S., Allan, R., Belton, D., Moffat, F., Pufal, D., Balac, P., Hunter, A. and Shaw, N. (2013) ‘Flipping the Classroom with Just in Time Teaching and Peer Instruction: Case Studies from the Sciences and Business’. In: ALT-C 2013, 10-12 September 2013, East Midlands Conference Centre, University of Nottingham

Belton, D., Allan, R. and Bentley, S. (2013) ‘Inverting the Classroom for Final year Analytical Chemistry’. In: HEA STEM: Annual Learning and Teaching Conference 2013, 17-18 Apr 2013, University of Birmingham

Belton, D. and Miller, A. (2013) ‘Thermal Aggregation of Recombinant Protective Antigen: Aggregate Morphology and Growth RateJournal of Biophysics (751091). ISSN 1687-8000

2012

Austerberry, J. and Belton, D. (2012) ‘Small Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of Protein Aggregation’. In: Nanoformulation 2012, 27th May – 1st June 2012, Barcelona, Spain

Fenton, A., Austerberry, J. and Belton, D. (2012) ‘Investigating the mechanisms responsible for and the factors affecting protein aggregation’. In: Nanoformulation 2012, 27th May – 1st June 2012, Barcelona

Winter, E., Laity, P. and Belton, D. (2012) ‘Synthesis of internally supported liposomes’. In: Nanoformulation 2012, 27th May – 1st June 2012, Barcelona, Spain

Taylor, N., Austerberry, J., Laity, P. and Belton, D. (2012) ‘The application of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields to aid protein crystallisation’. In: Nanoformulation 2012, 27th May – 1st June 2012, Barcelona, Spain

Winter, E., Laity, P. and Belton, D. (2012) ‘Characterisation of internally supported liposomes’. In: Nanoformulation 2012, 27th May – 1st June 2012, Barcelona, Spain

2010

Belton, D (2010) ‘Synthesis and characterisation of novel composite nano particles’. In: Nanoformulation 2010, 9th – 11th June 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

Austerberry, J., Miller, A. and Belton, D. (2010) ‘Elucidating the mechanism and thermodynamics of protein aggregation in order to create novel biomaterials’. In: Nanoformulation 2010, 9th – 11th June 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

2009

Belton, D. and Miller, A. (2009) ‘Thermal Aggregation of Protective Antigen Monitored by Light Scattering Spectroscopy’. In: 8th World Congress of Chemical Engineering (WCCE8), 23-27 August 2009, Palais des Congrès de Montréal

2005

Belton, D. and Miller, A. (2005) ‘What is the interrelation of protein structure and physical behaviour and how is it influenced by environmental conditions?’. In: 7th World Congress of Chemical Engineering, 10-14 July 2005, SECC, Glasgow

Belton, D. and Miller, A. (2005) ‘Protein structure and physical behaviour’. In: Protein Dynamics and Function, 4-6 January 2005, Leicester

Research Degree Supervision

Protein Behaviour

The project will focus on the physical characterisation of protein behaviour. This will involve relating aggregation to environmental conditions and changes in protein structure. Various analytical techniques will be utilised, including infrared, fluorescence and light scattering.

Smart Particles for Drug Delivery

The project will develop smart particles for improving the pharmacokinetics of macromolecules. This will involve the synthesis and characterisation of composite nano particles optimised for physical stability and biological interaction. The project will examine particle structure using microscopy, physical stability using light scattering techniques and biological behaviour using biological assays.

Biopharmaceutical Processing

The project will address the challenges associated with biopharmaceutical stability during manufacture and processing. The effect of various processing conditions will be examined in relation to protein aggregation and physical stability. Analytical techniques that will be utilised include spectroscopy, surface techniques and light scattering.

Biopharmaceutical Formulation

The project will focus on the formulation of biopharmaceuticals for physical stability. The effect of various additives will be examined in relation to protein structural stability and aggregation. Analytical techniques that will be utilised include electron microscopy, light scattering, fluorescence and infrared.

Catalysts for 2nd Generation Biofuels

The project will characterise and develop catalysts for the production of second generation biofuels. It will examine the stability and performance of existing catalysts in order to establish baseline behaviour. This will be followed by the characterisation of alternative novel materials which have the potential for similar catalytic activity coupled with improved stability. The work will utilise surface adsorption techniques and a catalyst testing rig.

Postgraduate research opportunities with Dr Daniel Belton

2017-18

PhD

2018-19

PhD